• Jun. 7, 2016
    When Edward (Ned) Burnell sees a design problem, he is always ready to find a better solution. Even while chatting with a journalist outside his office, he points out ceilings and windows in...
  • May. 31, 2016
    When she first arrived at MIT, a freshman in 2012, Cara Lai was focused on engineering studies. But it wasn't long before Lai discovered that the breadth and depth of an MIT education is designed to...
  • Apr. 12, 2016
    A portable ultrasound scanner is a marvelous device for medical diagnostic imaging — safe, painless, relatively inexpensive, and available instantly in a medical office or at a patient’s bedside. But...
  • Apr. 11, 2016
    Water filters of the future may be made from billions of tiny, graphene-based nanoscrolls. Each scroll, made by rolling up a single, atom-thick layer of graphene, could be tailored to trap specific...
  • Apr. 3, 2016
    Most of the world’s nations have agreed to make substantial reductions in their greenhouse gas emissions, but achieving these goals is still a considerable technological, economic, and political...
  • Feb. 28, 2016
    By understanding the role that eelgrass ecosystems play in preparing for and mitigating the effects of climate change we can better make the case for securing protection and restoration resources....
  • Feb. 18, 2016
    Genetically engineering any organism requires first getting its cells to take in foreign DNA. To do this, scientists often perform a process called electroporation, in which they expose cells to an...
  • Feb. 15, 2016
    Amos Winter may be an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at MIT, but he describes one of the most important aspects of his job as “detective work.” That’s what he, MIT PhD candidate ...
  • Jan. 31, 2016
    From developing smart 3-D scanners, to refining desalination techniques, to designing football helmets that can prevent concussions — undergraduates across the School of Engineering are midway...
  • Jan. 24, 2016
    From gene mapping to space exploration, humanity continues to generate ever-larger sets of data — far more information than people can actually process, manage, or understand. Machine learning...
  • Jan. 6, 2016
    According to Forbes magazine, their fifth annual 30 Under 30 lists showcase “America’s most important young entrepreneurs, creative leaders and brightest stars” who are less than than 30 years old....
  • Jan. 3, 2016
    It’s 1991. The first-ever web site is published, gas costs an average of $1.12 per gallon, and Jennifer Rumsey, SM ’98, walks into the office of John Wall, SB, SM ‘75, ScD ‘78, then Vice President of...
  • Jan. 3, 2016
    Professor John Heywood is one of the most recognizable and highly regarded names in internal combustion engines. His work with Professor James Fay and Professor James Keck in the MIT Sloan Automotive...
  • Jan. 2, 2016
    A joyride. A cruise. A flight to your next vacation or a drive to see your family. Or just simply getting from point A to point B. Whatever the reason, there are few people who don’t appreciate a...
  • Dec. 7, 2015
    MIT engineers have designed what may be the Band-Aid of the future: a sticky, stretchy, gel-like material that can incorporate temperature sensors, LED lights, and other electronics, as well as tiny...
  • Nov. 9, 2015
    Nature has developed innovative ways to solve a sticky challenge: Mussels and barnacles stubbornly glue themselves to cliff faces, ship hulls, and even the skin of whales. Likewise, tendons and...
  • Oct. 8, 2015
    Deep in the jungles of the Yucatan peninsula, residents of the remote Mexican village of La Mancalona are producing clean drinking water using the power of the sun. For nearly two years now, members...
  • Jul. 31, 2015
    In the last two decades, prosthetic limb technology has grown by leaps and bounds. Today, the most advanced prostheses incorporate microprocessors that work with onboard gyroscopes, accelerometers,...
  • Jun. 21, 2015
    When graduate student Natasha Wright began her PhD program in mechanical engineering, she had no idea how to remove salt from groundwater to make it more palatable, nor had she ever been to India,...
  • Jun. 10, 2015
      A condensed version of a story by Courtney Humphries, MIT Technology Review   Uncomfortable shoes. Awkward crutches. Painful artificial limbs. When technology meets biology, the interface is rarely...

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